The Truth About Sharpness

I remember the first time I saw a DVD.  I had heard people talking about how clear the picture looked on a DVD when compared to a VHS tape.  I remember sitting there during the movie thinking to myself that I couldn’t tell a difference in picture quality from a VHS and a DVD.  Years went by and DVD became …

5 tips to show off the texture in your HDR photography

More than any other type of photography, HDR loves texture.  The reason is that the HDR process exaggerates fine detail in a scene.  Because texture has so much fine detail, we see it in a way that captivates viewers.  There are a few ways to bring even more texture out of your HDR photos that you might like to know. …

My HDR photos are noisy!

Actually, they probably aren’t noisy but if you clicked on this link, I bet they are suffering from grain.  What’s the difference between noise and grain?  Let’s talk.  This post is an excerpt from my book “Improve Your HDR Photography.”  If you’d like to buy the book, you can buy a digital copy for $5.99 direct from this website and …

Wide-angle portraits

Most people think of standard or telephoto lenses as being best suited for portrait photography, but never dare experiment with wide-angle lenses.  If your portrait photography is beginning to feel a bit stale, then try this new technique. Wide-angle lenses distort distances.  What is close to the lens seems unusually large, and what is far away from the camera seems …

Bite-sized composition in photography

We’ve all heard the old maxim “Don’t bite off more than you can chew.”  It is solid sage wisdom and deserves every photographer’s attention.  When photographers discuss composition and framing, we usually think of the rule of thirds, leading lines, framing, and the golden mean; however, it can be helpful to apply the age-old wisdom of not biting off more …

Focus and recompose, or compose and focus?

Portrait photography often means short depth-of-field.  In fact, when the photographer is close to the subject and a low aperture (such as f/1.8) is used, then the depth-of-field an be as short as one inch (3 centimeters?).  Even slight variations in focus can take the focus off the model’s eye and make it slightly blurry.  In portrait photography, the eyes …