The Most Stolen Camera Award Goes to….

Lenstag, a mobile app that lets you record your camera serial numbers and then find it if it gets stolen, publishes data showing the most stolen camera models, as well as where cameras are stolen.  Petapixel posted the data in an infographic and it’s too good not to share.

Interesting that the D7000 tops the list.  But frankly, I don’t blame the perps.  It’s one of those models that will go down in history as a favorite.  But I will point out that the data is from Lenstag’s users.  I’d like to see the data taken one step further and include a breakdown of Lenstag users compared to sales of the camera per capita to see what camera models are actually more likely to be stolen.  Really, all this shows is that D7000 users are the largest segment of Lenstag’s users.

And where do you need to watch out for your gear most?  In the car.  I always put my camera in the trunk so it is out of sight, which also keeps the gear from getting overheated in the summer.

Check it out…

lenstag


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Jim Harmer

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Jim Harmer is the founder of Improve Photography, and host of the popular Improve Photography Podcast. More than a million photographers follow him on social media, and he has been listed at #35 in rankings of the most popular photographers in the world. Jim travels the world to shoot with readers of Improve Photography in his series of free photography workshops. See his portfolio here.

Comments

  1. I’ve seen this before. And I think you have to take into account the percentage of each type of camera that is out there. I bought a D7000 as did an awful lot of other people. Was it one of the best selling cameras of the last few years? Probably. Kind of like this: Ford F150 is one of the most commonly stolen vehicles because it’s one of the most common vehicles.

  2. Also, think of the thieves that steal a camera bag – not even knowing if there is a camera in it or not. Let alone the make or model.

  3. The big ‘miss’ here is that the data is compiled from only one source. The ‘types’ of people that would use lenstag also would use a higher end camera.

    I can almost guarantee that if a variety of sourced could have been accessed (insurance claims for instance) that enthusiast level Canon would have topped the list.

    Overall it is really a PR exercise for lenstag.

    What they should have published was recovery rates improved through use of their service.

  4. I’d love to have that data (numbers of particular models in circulation) but I haven’t been able to find it. Any idea where I could get it?

  5. Yikes, my Jeep is very easy to break into. I better look into some of these

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